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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)
's go now to tunisia, where the uprising began two years ago after a young street vendor to set himself alight in protest. has the promise of the so-called revolution lived up to expectations? our chief international correspondent reported two years ago. she is back there for us tonight. >> outside the governor's office there is another -- photos of when he set himself on fire years ago. no one paid attention. he still has the scars. now he is on hunger strike. this place is to our south of the capital. it is full of desperate young men. you can feel it at the hollywood cafe. nothing, nothing has changed, this man says. there are still in their jobs. all the leverage -- all the revolution brought to us was freedom of expression. that anger boiled over on the streets here last week. tunisia is resolution began in the marginal areas just like this. the same frustration still fester. two years ago, i visited his grieving mother in their hometown. this time, i met her in her new home in the capital. her family had to move. her son, the icon of the revolution, is now resented by many. >> do
president of tunisia. that incident cut short a ceremony marking the second anniversary of the revolution. >> holdings speeches to commemorate. >> he set himself on fire in an act of protest and it signified weeks of protest forcing out the country's dictator. for more on the anniversary in tunisia, on the ground there reporting since the beginning of what is now called the era of the spring and joining us near the bolivian border. sara, his death is seen as the deaf that inspired revolution in tunisia. is there a sense of accomplishment for this appointment? >> people are proud in tunisia to have been the first country in the region to topple their dictator. at the same time, they're disappointed. they're not meeting their social and economic demands. it is going to take more than a few years, but they are frustrated. >> there has been some progress. before he was toppled, you personally had to accord a pseudonym for your safety. you can now use your real name. how would you describe the situation there for journalists? >> conditions have improved significantly. it has become a lot more
of their own. two years on, we are back in tunisia where the arab uprisings began. we see the opulence that angered so many. it is midday in london. sydney, home to the radio station whose prank call has caused such tragedy. two radio personalities persuaded two blundered nurses -- london nurses to give them information over the phone. one of the nurses is now dead. presenters are giving their reaction and their account of the call they made. let's go to duncan kennedy, joining us from sydney. >> in many ways, this was a very difficult interview for these two to carry out. it was too full. it was emotional. not surprisingly, they have been receiving counseling because of all the public anger directed at them. they said they wanted to tell their story. more importantly, they wanted to say sorry. >> today, michael christian and mel greig are two yong people under intense -- two young people under intense pressure. >> emerging after days in hiding to give their version e theirvents. in a raw -- version of events. in a raw and tearful interview, they said they were guided by what had happe
to countries like egypt and tunisia. very careful to limit investment in any way, shape, or form. however, you will find bmw, four seasons hotels chains and so on. you will find them but in smaller numbers and they're always connected to some sort of deal whereby the government has some control, if not over the ownership of the property but the usage, the usage rights. >> so how has the government made this system inefficient? what has caused the inefficiency? >> the inefficiency is really a function of how economic -- were made based on the members rather than on a broader economic strategy that's part of the future for the country based on its resources, its endowments, human and other resources. and in the end you had what i call the circumscribe liberalization process where the benefits of the liberalization process were siphoned off by these networks as opposed to being spread out into society. and in the end, the policies became so rampant that they started producing contradictory outcomes. so you would have -- allow you to mobilize the sale of certain brand of jeans or bananas, for inst
. by the time i was, became of age of course he was gone. he was killed in 1943 in tunisia. and that's pretty much all i knew about him, except for what he looked like. there were mementos around my grandmother's house. and up at six years ago i decided i was going to see what i could do to find out more about it, and that was the beginning of this journey of discovery that led to the publication of my book. >> "into dust and fire." so his life was a good life at that point, right? there was some money, some family background, et cetera. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what w
and tunisia, yemen, bahrain and libya. he gave an interview in january to a good friends of mine, jay sol low moan, with "the wall street journal" where he said syria was immune from the arab spring. some of the mouthpieces for the regime in february and march were publishing articles in syrian forums that were supportive of the protesters in egypt and tunisia, and there was a contrast made that they authoritarian leaders who were lackeys of the united states and israel, were out of touch with the youth ask the populations in their countries, whereas the president of syria was a young 45 at the time. he was a computer nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all thre
with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who insisted that mubarak was not a dictator, which might be an insult to dictators if he spent 30 years securing that grip on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box but has been marred thanks to edicts by morsi. earning him the title of morsilini. or mubarak with a beard. revolution is going. syria is teetering, jordan is burning and the future is yet to be written. the question, will there be elections, will islamists win, will it be one man one vote or one man, one vote, one time. with that, we are going to debate the motion, if democracy is going to triumph are victories at the ballot box unavoidable. we will have opening remarks f
. he was killed in 1943 in tunisia and that is pretty much all i knew about him except for what he looks like. there were momentous around mike and mothers house and about six years ago i decided i was going to see what i could do to find out more about it and that was the beginning of@w this journeyf discovery that led to the publication of my book. >> "into dust and fire." >> "into dust and fire." >> so his life was a good life at that point, right? there was the family back in etc.. >> were comfortable, yeah. >> what inspired rob cox to six months before go off to europe? >> well this is one of the questions that fascinated me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man, and i know that. he went to a school that was a christian school and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be about more than just yourself. it was meant to be helpful to others in that kind of thing and there were a few less noble motivations. he graduated from college and had no obvious plans. he had but we would now call a lerogue -- low draft number. he knew ther
. tunisia's islamist prime minister has rejected calls to resign after more violent protests. hundreds of people attacked a police station in a northern province. the region has seen three days of violent demonstrations over economic hardship. more than 300 people have been injured. >> a newspaper in germany says the government is planning to increase the support given to asylum seekers. it is the first race since 1993 and results from a court order, but the support will come as food, goods, and services, and not as cash. >> nasa scientists say they found ice on mercury. the planet that is closest to the sun. the frozen water is at the polls, which are almost permanently in shadow. the information was delivered by the messenger spacecraft, which landed on mercury last year. >> in germany, a nuclear waste site that has been at the center of often violent protests is seeing and hauled in exploratory work there. the decision was handed down by the environment minister. >> and it should clear the way for talks on a final storage site for germany's nuclear waste. politicians hope to reach a
, bathed in tunisia, snorkled in sinai and danced in israeli discos. in libya i played tennis with the daughter of his libyan tennis coach, learned about medical school in libya and jogged through the ruins. but, as we said, chris always came home and entertained us when he did. i worked hard to sharpen tennis and skiiing skills. i was proud the year chris said you ski faster than the master. [ laughter] >> we got up early to be the first on the ski lift. at my wedding he said he would be happy by to perform a libyan liberation dance to celebrate the success of the revolution. [ laughter] >> he inspired me to travel and work inter nationally. i filled out an application for the peace corp. during my senior year because he had. he taught english in morocco. i taught math. we talked about the joys of living and working over seas. we spoke french together. later he helped me get an assignment with a pediatric a.i.d.s. group. now i work in a county hospital in stockton caring for patients from all over the world. like chris, i am genuinely interested in listening to their stories
revolution, john, captures egypt, gaza, tunisia, north mali and soon syria. the revolution is at hand. >> obamacare and new a new and welcome urgency on gun safety and gun violence. >> mama. >> the accumulation of personal information on vast numbers of americans which was brilliantly exploited by the obama team to get out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national
not -- tunisia man was not been interviewed. he will not talk to the bureau unless he has legal representation with him. a top official says there are good reasons for this delay. >> taking longer than probably a lot of people expected because of the changes in the regimes. tunisia, libya and other places, now you have to deal with new rules and new regulations and new people. >> the fbi has not offered any comments citing its pending investigation. shep. >> shepard: catherine herridge live in washington. iran claims it has once again captured a u.s. spy drone but this time the u.s. navy insists no drones in the region are missing right now. the iranians say the scan eagle drone as they call it flu flew into its airspace. iranians claim this is the video evidence. they reveal how they quote the video or captured the drone. iranian regime made similar claims regarding the stealth zone still unclear when it captured it or crash landed on iranian territory. either way the new drone is said to be far less sophisticated. the pentagon points out several countries used the scan eagle so theoretically
east, supportive of israel, and tunisia was a little bit, but, by that point, already crossed the threshold and ali was out, and syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers into which are iran, lebanon, israel, you know, where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. libya presented a -- was unique that that the libyans -- there was a popular uprising, there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward instead of on the first unofficial, then increasingly official spokeman of the program. this was a program that doesn't exist in syria at the moment, and this was an opportunity for, essentially, for president obama or the united states to make some good on much of the contents of the 2009 speech, which is very important. i think people are essentially losing sight of that. the second take away, i think, is the question of intelligence and what we've known g
running it although his name is not marriott anymore. arnie. >> got it. >> go on. sorry. >> tunisia? >> what about tunisia. >> that is where the secretary of state was supposed to leave for tunisia today. >> is she set to do wellesley again? >> not directly. >> she went to wellesley and you went to wellesley. the only democrat you could ever support for president. >> exactly. >> she went to wellesley. she got a stomach flu. >> she got a stomach flu. she wanted to go to tunisia for a specific reason. we talk about the arab spring, this is one of the places there's great hopes this may turn into a really functioning democracy and a place with economic freedom as well. this is a place where the arab spring started. remember, this wasn't a democratic revolution, it turned into one. the man who started the arab spring was a vendor whose scale had been taken from him many times from a bureaucrat. he lit himself on fire and his words were, how do you expect me to make a living. we can talk about democratic freedom but economic freedom is just as important. >> and in tunisia, they've been t
to serve in tunisia and egypt the two countries of the arab spring. this leads to a better understanding of the institution on the ground, presenting some of my thoughts and offering some insight into the country of egypt in general. then i will focus on how this event affects israel. but before i start, let me show you during my time at the washington institute, -- [inaudible] i was concerned with what i called the freethinkers. we don't belong to any organization. this will be for a diplomat. i am cautioned to escape from this, but without success. it doesn't present any official view. to me, the arab spring did not begin to years ago in tunisia, as we commonly believed. but in fact, only two weeks ago in egypt. but what has happened in tunisia and egypt was actually a long journey. the popular uprising in the downfall of the regime in tunisia and egypt and libya. what we are starting to see in tunisia is a true political idea for the future and the character of the country. the process in egypt today has to do with the democracy of the country with those two countries struggling for d
in cairo and it could spread to numerous countries. it could be libya or tunisia. people are talking about jordan though the headlines out of jordan have not been dramatic. then you have iraq and the ongoing war up here in syria. is your fare that if egypt continues to go the way you are describing that others go along with it? >> absolutely, bill. this is the right map. we need to have an understanding of what's going on. if the muslim brotherhood take hold they will have an alliance with the islamists of tunisia, and in between sandwiching libya, so from tunisia to gaza you are going to have this huge islamist block, the most concerning point would be what would morsi do. then as we just mentioned into jordan. it's a marchs order. bill: where does the united states fit into all of this. we have been largey silent, would you agree? >> there is a pattern when we had 1.5 million people in the street of tehran. they were secular. we said we don't meddle. now we have the secular on the streets of egypt versus the islamists and we are silent. the administration is partnering with the islamists
was still very well remembered, he was killed in tunisia. that's pretty much all i knew about him except for what he looked like. about six years ago i decided that i was going to see what i could do to learn more about him. and that was the beginning of this journey of discovery. it led to the publication of my book. >> "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." >> that's right, "into dust and fire." >> his life was a good life at that point. there was some money at that point? >> yes, they were comfortable. >> what inspired rob cox to go off to europe? >> this is one of the questions that fascinated me when i started researching. he was an idealistic man, and i know that. he went to school there was a christian school. and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be more about than just yourself. be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble note motivations. he had graduated from college, he had no other obvious plans. and we have what we would now call a low draft number. there was a good chance that he would
government. problems in tunisia. problems still remaining in afghanistan and that corrupt government. i am still waiting to find out what it is that we are going to do that scares iran enough to shut down the nuclear program. in the meantime are we putting any real muscle on these crazy mad men? no demanding israel to stop bed rins. i think somehow we are missing something. i think we put more pressure on crazy governments building nuclear devices and releasing gas on their own citizens than we should about israelis making veterans in their own backyards in their own families. >>> nbc sports bob costas created a whole lot of controversy last sunday night while coming on the news about kansas city belcher having killed his girlfriend before taking his own life. he says if belcher didn't possess a gun he and cassandra would be alive. kostas spent the week defending his comments. here he is on "o'reilly factor." >> i never used the words gun control. i quoted from a column by jason wit lock who was in kansas city for a long time. now is on the fox sports web site in which he mentioned credibl
these guys, and no good can come on that. it's folly, and i think we're seeing in libya and egypt and tunisia and yemen, probably ria. lou: 15 seconds. very quickly. we just received word that the president is recognizing that syrian opposition coalition and opposition to the regime. a positive element. >> again coming days now with the wrong guys is seems to me. lou: thank you very much. i'm sorry. absolutely out of time. we thank you for being with us. clifford may and frank gaffney. thank you both. up next, the union uproar in michigan having little to do with worker or their rights to organize. it will take up with the unions really lose, why it is their lifeblood in tonight's "chalk talk." the liberal mainstream media teaming up against george solomon, the "washington post" with a questionable defense of nbc's objectionable editing. attorneys join us here next. from the bt players in history to the number 1 club in the world. the potential of manchester united unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. heartburn symptoms causedelieve by acid reflux disease. osteoporosis-re
in tunisia, but there has been great frustration among lawmakers that the fbi hasn't had immediate access to the suspect in tunisia, and some have taken to the floor here on capitol hill to say that u.s. taxpayer aid ought to be cut off until these countries begin to cooperate with us. >> why are we giving any sort of aid to a country that has proven at this time it is no friend or ally of the united states? why are we not doing everything in our power to investigate the events in benghazi that killed four americans? should secretary clinton fail to cut off aid to tunisia, i will take legislative action to cut off the aid to tunisia. >> reporter: just to remind folks, this investigation into the benghazi terrorist attack is being treated under the law enforcement model by the obama administration which means the fbi is the lead investigating body. and earlier this week fox news asked the attorney general to respond to criticism that it really seems stalled to the public, and he said that there is more going on in the investigation than meets the eye. >> you talk about one part of the inve
are repeating the spin tunisia and egypt and libya. they are separate. you have been putting a sequence within libya, too. >> lib with a comes after those attacks had occurred. >> the thing they were different sources. the difference genesis and one was crowd mob action. >> to equate the two are to make it sound like all the same. >> this came afterwards, it could be that people had extremist goals taking advantage of this moment in the middle east. >> fallacy, libya thing was terrorism as rick has been saying. >> now we know. >> jon: and to continue jim's latin run, personae, ambassador susan rice was spawned by the abhorrent video. then when there was different story behind it she withdraw her tomorrow nation to be secretary of state -- she withdrew her nomination. >> when i went on the sunday shows on september 16th i was doing just as i have always done providing the best information available to me and available to our government at the time. i was very careful to explain that the information was preliminary and it could change. yet i think it was misconstrued and contorted to something m
in hawaii yesterday for their christmas vacation. >>> tunisia auctioning off, clothing, jewelry, art all among the items people can bid on, but the highlight is expected to be the cars including a lamborghini and a bentley and an armored d cadill cadillac. >>> more top stories at the top of the hour when "cnn sunday morning" continues. i'll randi kaye. dr. sanjay gupta md begins right now. >>> what might be the most upsetting story i ever reported. i want to start by saying the kind of horrible violence that we saw in newtown, connecticut, it isn't new. the worst school attack took place more than 80 years ago in michigan. there was this new school, baath consolidated school which was the pride and joy of that community. this farmer, he became angry about that. so, get this, for weeks he put dynamite under the local school and then eventually blew it up. 38 children died. and then he killed himself with another load of dynamite. we'll never truly know for sure why he did all that ask or what made the young man in newtown unload a rifle into a classroom full of first graders. i looked a
in benghazi that killed four americans. should hillary clinton cut off the name to tunisia, i will take legislative action to cut off the aid in tunee in tunes aid to tunisia. >> reporter: there are tie suspecttwo suspects in custody. bill: they are calling for a special committee to investigate benghazi similar to the watergate committee convened in the 1970s. steve king says there is no comparison to watergate, he says benghazi is much bigger. >> i believe it is a lot bigger than watergate. if you add at gate and iran contra together and multiply it by ten you'll get in the zone of where benghazi is. i don't think the public has any idea and i don't either of the chronology of events, what took place and who was where doing what or why. bill: all these questions, steve king when he joins us live in about 25 minutes here on "america's newsroom." >> reporter: fox news alert on a disturbing new report shedding light on a government agency that is apparently plagued with a long list of problems. doug mcelway is live in washington. tell us about the report, doug. >> reporter: it's all abou
. building that country up. you have got democracy moving forward in tunisia and libya is certainly better off. if you look at a more complex issue, the nuclear weapons, president obama has done more than any other president to secure the very weapons that would be the most dangerous to us. >> laura: there you have it. nancy said libya throughout the middle east, iraq, afghanistan, these are signs of progress, a bumpy road. we all knew it was going to be bumpy. what's your reaction? >> i this that i nancy is living in cloud cookie land if she thinks the world is safer today under president obama. dick cheney is absolutely right. the world is far more dangerous today. there is a great lack of u.s. leadership under president obama this is the administration i think that has significantly led from behind. it's outsourced its own u.s. leadership on the world stage countries like france and turkey. this is not an administration that is interested in powerfully projecting american leadership internationally. we now see, of course, the middle east going up in flames. and there is absolutely no le
presidents. and syria is having 40 or 50,000 people killed by its own government. problems in tunisia and still in afghanistan and that corrupt government and i guess i'm still waiting to find out what it is that we do that scarce iran and the nuclear program. in the meantime, are we putting muscle on the crazy men? no, you know what we've been doing in the last couple of years, demanding that-- maybe i'm missing something, i believe we ought to put a lot more pressure on them releasing sarhanen gas rather than israelis building those in the back yards for their families, just my thoughts. now, nbc sport's bob costas created a controversy while talking about the kansas city chief player jovan belcher killing his girlfriend before taking his life. he says if belcher didn't have a gun he and cassandra would be alive and here he is trying to explain his comments on the o'reilly factor. >> i didn't call for any specific prohibition on guns and i voted from a column by jason whitlock and now on the fox supports website, in which he mentioned a gun culture in this country and it plays itsel
and egypt and tunisia and yemen, probably syria. lou: 15 seconds. very quickly. we just received word that the president is recognizing that syrian opposition coalition and opposition to the regime. a positive element. >> again coming days now with the wrong guys is seems to me. lou: thank you very much. i'm sorry. absolutely out of time. we thank you for being with us. clifford may and frank gaffney. thank you both. up next, the union uproar in michigan having little to do with workers or their rights to organize. it will take up with the unions really lose, why it is their lifeblood in tonight's "chalk talk." the liberal mainstream media teaming up against george solomon, the "washington post" with a questionable defense of nbc's objectionable editing. attorneys join us here next. ♪ lou: when president obama was at a detroit auto factory yesterday he blasted right-to-work laws saying they had nothing to do with economics and everything to do with politics, i believe it is it all about money, and politics. here is something you may not have known about the state of michigan. 17.95%
form of dictatorship that represented. we were in egypt and tunisia within a month after the uprising. it was thrilling. there is risk as we have seen because of some of the countries like egypt, the people who won the first elections were muslim brotherhood. the answer is not to disengage. the answer is to let the world know that america's historic interest in stability in the middle east and freedom everywhere requires us to stay engaged and engage more in the middle east. in those countries in the arab world that have elected new leaders that were worried about do everything we can through diplomacy and economic assistance to move them in the right direction toward most of all to convince them to keep holding democratic elections. so the people can judge the work they do. >> a lot of americans say to me we are sick and tired being the world's policeman. actually quite relieved we're pulling out of afghanistan. we did send troops into libya. not sending troops in to syria. it is not our problem. our problem is jobs and the economy. our lives here. >> america has to take sides in a g
given more than $320,000 taxpayer dollars to tunisia. i ask that all u.s. aid to tunisia be cut off because they're blocking the attempt to investigate the terrorist. why are we giving any sort of aid to a country that's proven at this time is no friend or ally to the united states? why are we not doing everything in our power to investigate the events in benghazi that killed four americans? should secretary clinton fail to cut off aid to tunisia, i will take legislative action to cut off the aid to tunisia. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> i rise to recognize the outstanding service of jay johnson of the department of defense in navigating a wide range of important legal issues, he's been an invaluable partner to the house aarped services committee. over the last four years he advised the committee on numerous national security
in october. a second was arrested in egypt and there's a third suspect that's been held in to tunisia r two months. the attorney general defended the f.b.i. investigation saying there was more going on than meets the eye. >> you talk about one part of the investigation, an investigation that's ongoing and our efforts with regard to that specific part that you mentioned are indeed ongoing and we'll see how that develops. but there are a range of other things we're doing with regard to the benghazi incident we don't talk about. >> reporter: the real take away today is that there's a pretty tight lid among lawmakers on what was said in the briefings to bring them up to date on the status of the investigation. about a week from today we may get the first public it testimony from the secretary of state. today that department sugg the date could slide. on capitol hill they believe it will happen as planned. >> cath ridge herridge, thank you. now to rick nelson from the center for strategic and international studies a nonprofit organization in d.c. i understand i can call you ozzie. >> thank you,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 96 (some duplicates have been removed)